About

End Family Fire


End Family Fire

Across the nation, gun owners and non-gun owners alike face the devastating impacts of family fire — which is a shooting involving an improperly stored or misused gun in the home that results in death or injury. Every day, 8 children and teens are unintentionally injured or killed due to an unlocked or unsupervised gun in the home1. Unintentional shootings, suicide, and intentional shootings are all forms of family Fire.

Family fire is preventable, and that’s exactly what our End Family Fire initiative aims to do. Brady’s End Family Fire initiative is designed to drive social change and save lives, educating and encouraging gun owners about safe gun storage. We believe ending family fire is in our hands to solve. We’re calling on gun owners and non-gun owners alike to unite—to talk about safe storage practices, save lives, and End Family Fire once and for all.

The Facts That Make Us Act

  • 4.6 million children live in homes with access to an unlocked or unsupervised gun2.
  • 75 percent of kids know where that gun is stored in their home3.
  • 1 in 5 parents said their child never handled guns without supervision. They were mistaken4.
  • 51 percent of all suicide fatalities are by firearm and 60 percent of all gun deaths are by suicide5.
  • 75 percent of school shootings are facilitated by kids having access to unsecured and/or unsupervised guns at home6.

You Can End Family Fire — Here’s How

You have the power to End Family Fire by following our motto: Ask, Act, Talk, and Learn. These four simple, easy to ask questions and actions can prevent avoidable tragedies.

1. ASK

First things first, ASK family, friends, and members of your community about unlocked or loaded guns in the home. Parents and guardians often ask questions before they let their kids visit other homes, but one question rarely asked is, “Is there an unlocked gun in your home?” This simple question will save lives. As families grow and circumstances expand, here are other questions to ensure safe storage.

  • Teens taking their first babysitting job: “Is there an unlocked and/or loaded gun in your home?”
  • Older teens and young adults moving into a group home: “Does anyone own a gun? If so, how is it stored?”
  • When considering the care of an elderly family member, especially those who may suffer from a form of dementia: “ Do we need to rethink how we safely store the guns?”

    2. ACT

    ACT responsibly and always store your guns locked, unloaded, and out of reach from children and those who should not have access to firearms. Keeping guns locked and unloaded reduces Family Fire risk by 73 percent7. Safe storage must be a top priority for all gun owners, and that means we must ACT responsibly when firearms are in the home. Here are 5 steps to ACT safely.

    • Have ongoing conversations with family and friends about responsible gun ownership and gun safety.
    • Always store ammunition separately from its gun. This reduces the risk of Family Fire up to 61 percent8.
    • If traveling, transport your gun locked inside a cool, clean, dry carrying case or storage box. Numerical combinations or fingerprint recognition locks are a must.
    • If you are not confident or have doubts about gun ownership, consider other home protection alternatives, such as home security systems or guard dogs.
    • Reassess your safe storage plan yearly. Have circumstances changed?

    3. Talk

    It’s time to TALK with your family, friends, and community about responsible gun ownership and teach them about safe storage practices. Children are handling guns without supervision—and that’s why families must TALK about safe gun storage practices, especially those with children, teens, or grandparents.

    • Make sure that gun safety is discussed and a part of your family’s safety conversation. When addressing gun safety, don’t forget to consider how these conversations change as your family evolves and grows.
    • Gun owners, in particular, play a powerful role in educating non-gun owners about safe storage practices. We highly encourage gun owners to help End Family Fire by spreading the word about responsible gun ownership and storage.

      4. Learn

      Finally, it’s important to LEARN about safe gun storage options and local gun safety policy measures that will help reduce the risk of Family Fire.

      • Extreme Risk Laws provide family, intimate partners, household members, law enforcement officials, and — in some cases — healthcare professionals a safe and effective way of removing access to firearms for at-risk individuals. Extreme risk laws are civil court orders that enable guns to be temporarily removed from the home, and further purchases prevented.
      • Safe Storage Laws promote responsible gun-owning practices by requiring gun owners to keep their firearms out of the reach of others, such as children, who could use the weapon to deadly effect.
      • And if you no longer want a gun in the home, contact local law enforcement to learn how to legally and safely dispose of your unwanted weapon.

      1. Brady averaged the five most recent years of complete data from death certificates (2013-17) available via CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System, cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/fatal.html, and three most recent years of complete data from emergency department visits (2013, ‘14, and ‘16) available via the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s (HCUP’s) online query system, hcupnet.ahrq.gov
      2. Azrael, D., Cohen, J., Salhi, C. et al. J Urban Health (2018) 95: 295. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524...
      3. Baxley, Frances, and Matthew Miller. “Parental Misperceptions About Children and Firearms.” Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 160, no. 5, 2006, p. 542., doi:10.1001/archpedi.160.5.542.
      4. Baxley, Frances, and Matthew Miller. “Parental Misperceptions About Children and Firearms.” Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 160, no. 5, 2006, p. 542., doi:10.1001/archpedi.160.5.542.
      5. “FastStats - Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/suici...
      6. Hobbs, Tawnell D. “Most Guns Used in School Shootings Come From Home.” The Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones & Company, 5 Apr. 2018, www.wsj.com/articles/in-school-shootings-most-guns-come-from-home-1522920600.
      7. Grossman DC, Mueller BA, Riedy C, et al. Gun Storage Practices and Risk of Youth Suicide and Unintentional Firearm Injuries. JAMA. 2005;293(6):707–714. doi:10.1001/jama.293.6.707
      8. Grossman DC, Mueller BA, Riedy C, et al. Gun Storage Practices and Risk of Youth Suicide and Unintentional Firearm Injuries. JAMA. 2005;293(6):707–714. doi:10.1001/jama.293.6.707