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Resources

Key Gun Violence Statistics


The Facts That Make Us Act

How many people are shot in the U.S.? How many Americans are injured by guns?

These are important questions to answer. We need reliable gun violence data in order to accurately understand America’s gun violence epidemic. That is why Brady relies on the most accurate resources available when looking to understand the way gun violence impacts the U.S.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) provides annual gun fatality data. Using data from the most recent years available (2013-2017), Brady established five-year averages to represent annual gun fatalities in the most accurate way possible.

However, while Brady historically used CDC data to establish averages for gun injuries as well, recent findings show there are more accurate sources. Due to funding restrictions and other constraints, the sample size utilized by the CDC is so small one has to question its statistical significance. Data provided by Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s HCUPnet, and collected from emergency departments and databases, gives a more comprehensive picture of the way gun injuries affect those living in the U.S.. The numbers below represent a three-year average of the most recent HCUPnet data available (2013, ‘14, and ‘16).

This difference in data source has had an impact on some of the numbers compared to previous statistics reported by Brady. Amongst those differences, it is important to note that data reported for children and teens previously included 0-19 year olds, and now contains data only for 1-17 year olds. This change is responsible for a significant decrease in the number of deaths and injuries reported in this category due to the high number of gun injuries found amongst 18-19 year olds.

Statistics on Daily Gun Violence in America

Daily Gun Violence Impacting People of All Ages in the U.S.

Every day, 310 people are shot in the United States. Among those:

  • 100 people are shot and killed
  • 210 survive gun injuries
  • 95 are injured in an attack
  • 61 die from suicide
  • 10 survive a suicide attempt
  • 1 is killed unintentionally
  • 90 are shot unintentionally
  • 1 is killed by legal intervention
  • 4 are shot by legal intervention
  • 1 died but the intent was unknown
  • 12 are shot but the intent was unknown

DAILY GUN VIOLENCE IMPACTING children and teens (1-17)

Every day, 21 children and teens (1-17) are shot in the United States. Among those:

  • 4 die from gun violence
  • 2 are murdered
  • 17 children and teens survive gun injuries
  • 8 are injured in an attack
  • 2 children and teens either die from suicide or survive a suicide attempt
  • 8 children and teens are shot instances of family fire — a shooting involving an improperly stored or misused gun found in the home resulting in injury or death

Annual Gun Violence Impacting People of All Ages in the U.S.

Every year, 113,108 people are shot. Among those:

  • 36,383 people die from gun violence
  • 12,830 are murdered
  • 76,725 people survive gun injuries
  • 34,566 are injured in an attack
  • 22,274 die from suicide
  • 3,554 survive a suicide attempt
  • 496 are killed by legal intervention
  • 1,376 are shot by legal intervention
  • 295 die but the intent was unknown
  • 4,471 are shot but the intent is unknown
  • 509 women are killed by their husband or male dating partner*

ANNUAL GUN VIOLENCE IMPACTING children and teens (ages 1-17)

Every year, 7,782 children and teens are shot in the United States. Among those:

  • 1,488 children and teens die from gun violence
  • 772 are murdered
  • 6,294 children and teens survive gun injuries
  • 2,788 injured in an attack
  • 590 die from suicide
  • 166 survive a suicide attempt
  • 86 are killed unintentionally
  • 2,893 are shot unintentionally
  • 30 die but the intent was unknown
  • 380 are shot but the intent is unknown

*This number is a five-year average derived from Violence Policy Center’s “When Men Murder Women” analysis of FBI homicide data, 2012-16 (the five most recent years available for this).

Brady averaged the five most recent years of complete data from death certificates (2013-17) available via CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System, cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/fatal.html, and three most recent years of complete data from emergency department visits (2013, ‘14, and ‘16) available via the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s (HCUP’s) online query system, hcupnet.ahrq.gov.

Emergency department statistics on HCUPnet are from the HCUP Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD), and State Inpatient Databases (SID). All diagnoses of external cause of injury that patients receive in emergency departments are assigned an International Classification of Diseases (ICD) code. The assignments of specific ICD codes are reflected in the data shown here.